Weekly Readings: Medicare’s anniversary, ICD-10 prep, and Angelina Jolie

[vc_column fade=”” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” width=”1/2″]This week wishes a happy anniversary to government-funded health insurance program, Medicare/Medicaid. U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson signed Medicare and Medicaid into law on July 30, 1965 as an amendment to the Social Security Act. At the time, about half of those 65 and older didn’t have health insurance, and were constantly afraid of medical bills potentially putting their families into poverty.

Today, 55 million Americans rely on these programs to provide them with needed medical care.

In other news, ICD-10 is still a hot topic, as the deadline is soon approaching. Even though there’s officially a grace period, it’s still something to be prepared for. And remember when Angelina Jolie first announced her BRCA1 test results? One study looks back into the impact that had on your average person getting tested.

 

1. Medicare program shows improvements in health outcomes & costs since 1999 – Cardiovascular Business

A recent study in JAMA focused on trying to find the good in healthcare has done a bit of just that. Researchers found that all-cause mortality rates, hospitalization rates, and expenditures per beneficiary dropped from 1999 to 2013. Patients who were hospitalized also experienced better survival rates.

2. 10 tips to prepare for ICD-10 with the time that’s left – Medical Practice Insider

Just a couple months ago, the ICD-10 deadline seemed worlds away, but it’s rapidly approaching. In spite of the grace period (read about that here), claims will still be required to have an appropriate ICD-10 code.

So as you’re going back through your checklist, make sure you’ve thought through all of these. Sometimes the most logical steps are the easiest to miss, like asking your software provider about ICD-10 support (spoiler: Novarad already has that covered).[vc_column fade=”” fade_animation=”in” fade_animation_offset=”45px” width=”1/2″]3. Study finds ‘considerable’ number of radiology mislabeling near-misses – Health Imaging

A recent study in the American Journal of Roentgenology indicates that although imaging has come a long way with error-proofing, there’s still some room for improvement. But is perfection possible?

4. Standards are emerging for use of color in medical imaging – Aunt Minnie

As color in imaging is becoming more common, so are the challenges associated with it. The number one offender? Consistency. Different vendors and different displays show different colors. Read here about one proposed solution, the Color Standard Display Function (CSDF).

5. Study examines “The Angelina Jolie Effect” on breast cancer screening – ITN

A bit of an interesting read here–how much exactly did Jolie’s decision to announce her positive test results for BRCA1 (a gene associated with increased risk of breast and ovarian cancers) influence people to get tested? Turns out, quite a bit–depending on how well you identified with Jolie herself.

Posted in Blog, Uncategorized

Comments are closed.