SIIM 2015 and the funeral for PACS

This past week we were pretty occupied with attending the SIIM (Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine) Annual Meeting in Washington D.C. The education sessions were very informative. Everything from enterprise imaging to radiation dose was covered amply. So are we looking at the death of the PACS system? The rise of the “enterprise” viewer (no longer “universal”)? The first couple articles should help settle those questions, and the rest is some good information you might have missed.

1. SIIM 2015: the narrative and navigation of healthcare analytics — Health Imaging

One question: What is the most important thing to remember about analytics? Data? Trends? Outcomes? Turns out you should be thinking about a lot more–and that may get overwhelming. Find a quick list here.

2. Start planning the funeral for PACS — Diagnostic Imaging

One of the hot topics at SIIM this past week was a future absence of PACS as we know them. Whether it boils down to payment reform, EMR adoption, or a multitude of other reasons, you may not be using a PACS in three years. It’s time to think about the future.

3. Healthcare data security is like a box of chocolates — Healthcare IT News

Surprise number: Sixty-five percent of healthcare organizations do not offer any protection services for patients whose information has been lost or stolen. At the same time, the same percentage believe that patients who do have their information lost or stolen and more likely to become victims of identity theft. Read on for more surprising insights–some that you may not have even thought of.[vc_column width=”1/2″]4. World’s first bio-limb: Rat forelimb grown in the lab — New Scientist

In case you didn’t hear about it, here’s some rather cool news. Harold Ott of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston grew the limb from living cells. While an exciting development, it’s not the first the world has seen of lab-grown body parts, and though this one is significantly more complex than some previous successes, it will still be a challenge to grow fully functioning limbs.

5. ICD-10 testing shows few coding errors — Healthcare IT News

The most recent end-to-end testing done by CMS revealed that ICD-10 success rates were even higher than they were in January, with 88 percent of claims passing perfectly and only 2 percent being rejected due to coding errors. Looks optimistic!

Posted in Uncategorized

Comments are closed.